Weird disamb/subtitle/ETI-type thing


As some of you may know, Alice Cooper is currently running a mock election campaign for both president in the US and prime minister in the UK. To this end he has released a single, a re-recording of the 1972 song "Elected."

The audio content is the same on both versions, but the cover art and tagline are different. The reason I made this thread is the iTunes titles have the versions with “Alice Cooper for President 2016” and “Alice Cooper for Prime Minister 2016” in parentheses alongside the title “Elected.” This bashes into multiple style issues at the same time, and I’m not sure what to do. I’ve lined out some possible solutions:

  1. Leave “Elected” as the title for each and add “Alice Cooper for XXX” as a release-level disambiguation
  2. Treat the “Alice Cooper for XXX” as a subtitle and keep it in the release title with a colon (this would cause issues as “Alice Cooper for XXX” is also present in the track title)
  3. Treat “Alice Cooper for XXX” as ETI and leave it as is (this seems clunky and has already caused issues with the release group and recording)

Alternate suggestions welcome, as always.


I think I’d do this. Why would it cause issues? Track titles can have subtitles too :slight_smile:


We don’t normally add colons in track titles, do we? I don’t remember seeing that in the style guide.


Sure we do - the guideline is Style/Titles, not “Style/Release/Titles” :slight_smile: Tracks have subtitles less often, but when they do, nothing wrong with adding them with subtitle style!


Update: I think the audio content might be different. I just listened to the “Alice Cooper for President” version and there’s some chatter at the end about forming a third party and mentions of some U.S. cities. I can’t hear the UK version due to geographic restrictions, but it’s highly unlikely those lines at the end are present.
This raises a new style question: Should I still use the same release group, or should I split them off?

EDIT: Here’s a YouTube link. It may or may not work outside the USA.