Remaster with different length


#1

I see the official style guide says that remastered recordings should be merged with the original recording. However, what about the case where the length of the remastered version differs from the original?

For example I’m merging these recordings where the original release is 4 seconds longer than the remastered version. This would lead to the wrong track length on the release containing the remastered version if you let it set the track length based on the recording. Is this expected?

EDIT: I just noticed the examples at the bottom of the page that show that this exact issue is expected but I can’t delete this post so I’m just editing it to say I don’t need an answer after all.


#2

Regardless of the rest of the question, which you’ve answered yourself: this is generally a meh idea. I’m not sure there’s ever a case where using this button is good and I wonder if we should just remove it.


#3

Are you sure the album version is same as single version ?
We do merge remasters but it doesn’t mean we merge recordings when they are audibly different. :slight_smile:


#4

I’m all for it (MBS-7654) and even implemented it two years ago, but it didn’t get much support at the time.


#5

The songs were originally released one at a time, one per month for 6 months, as a subscription, then they were remixed/remastered and released to the public as the Pacific Myth EP.

However, I think I may have my terminology mixed up here. The songs do sound different, so I think “remixed” is the right term, not “remastered”. It’s confusing because if you see this article about this release in particular though you’ll see they used both terms to describe the songs on the EP release.


#6

If it’s remixed, then we should not merge them. :slight_smile:


#7

I’ll cancel the edits then, thanks.


#8

sometimes there is a second or two of silence before a recording starts after pressing play. The intention behind this would appear to make sure that there is a bit of a pause between songs on an lp cd etc so there’s no sudden annoying abrupt transition for between songs for the listener.

Perhaps it’s interesting to define where the official starting point of a recording is. 1. At the arrival of the first frequency, or 2. At the moment of pressing play.

Perhaps this accounts for the disrepancy between the 2 different lengths of the remastered version mtrolley refered to.


#9

I see what you mean, but in my case that is not what was happening. The tracks were remixed so they sound different, so they should be different recordings.

The length difference on the particular track I used as an example is because in the original release after the song ends there a sound like bubbles underwater for like 4 seconds, but in the remixed version they didn’t add that.


#10

I think there isn’t a solid definition that applies to all instances on exactly what is to be considered a remastered work, and what is to be considered a remixed work.

A remastered work often “sounds” louder and therefor different, while the frequency components are basically still in tact.

I’m wondering whether acoustic id is able to identify the difference between an remastered version and a version that was mastered before the remasted version / or the plain mix. (leaving aside underwater bubbles added in the intro).

Perhaps it might be something interesting to test.