Picard (v1.4.2): How to find the difference between Original Value & New Value?

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Tags: #<Tag:0x00007fcd82988058>

#1

I try to tag my local files from this album:


Most of my tracks are shown with a green check mark.

But all my tracks with an apostrophe (straight, curly or whatever you name it) are shown with a difference in the title. Unfortunately I can’t see any difference between this two titles #1 and #2 in track number 8 of above album (“Don’t Let Me Lose This Dream”)

How can I make this difference more obvious?


#2

I use this site for identifying the characters: http://www.babelstone.co.uk/Unicode/whatisit.html


#3

@SURIV: FANTASTIC. Thank you very much!

I found the difference:
#1 is U+2019 : RIGHT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK {single comma quotation mark}
#2 is U+0027 : APOSTROPHE {APL quote}

Where can I tell Picard not to modify my U+2019 to U+0027?


#4

I don’t know how to do that, but I would recommend editing the release in MusicBrainz anyway, since U+2019 is the preferred character for an apostrophe.


#5

And here is a scriptlet that someone once gave to me to change the apostrophe to a right single quotation mark for all items in a track list being edited. I keep it handy on the bookmark bar of my browser.

javascript:(function(){$('.track-name').each(function(index,element){$(this).val(this.value.replace(/'/g,"\u2019")).change();})}());

#6

There is a check box in the Metadata tab of the Options dialog: “Convert Unicode punctuation characters to ASCII”. Perhaps you have that checked?


#7

@Billy_Yank: THAT was it! Thank you very much for that hint!
This Option is enabled by default. After disabling it, I finally can compare the “real” values from my files with the one from MB.

Some more background informations from the online help:

Convert Unicode punctuation characters to ASCII: Converts Unicode punctuation characters in MusicBrainz data to ASCII for consistent use of punctuation in tags. For example, right single quotation marks (’) are converted to ASCII apostrophes (’), and horizontal ellipses (…) are converted to three full stops (.).

Maybe there are even more converted characters?